> DARKEST SKY IN EUROPE

  • Posted on: 14 February 2019
  • By: tihomiry

This is the beginning of my research on how dark the sky could be and what is benefit of a dark sky for astrophotography. I was inspired from those 2 sites. First one presents mathematical model of how dark the sky is. Orange is for very polluted sky, for yellow – you do not see the milky way, for green – sky is polluted of some degree up to the zenith, for blue – there is a shining at the horizon and grey is for a dark sky. The second map is for how much light each village emit. You can switch between the years.

1. http://darksitefinder.com/maps/world.html

2. http://www.lightpollutionmap.info/#zoom=8&lat=5183204&lon=2785360&layers=B0TFFFF

I went to Kara Tepe at the heart of the Rhodope mountains 1600m above the sea level. It is in the grey area and the sky was outstanding. You can get great shots with ease. Full if stars and details.
I will continue my research and use such locations to shoot faint objects. Here are some new photos of Lagoon nebula (40x30s ISO 25600) and M22 cluster (1x30s ISO 25600):




When we have a new newton telescope we shroud avoid touch the collimation of the secondary mirror as we may get into troubles.

You no more need large sensors and heavy equipment to do good general photos. The recent development of image sensors put silicon chip capabilities to it's limit by

Knowing what you are looking for is more then half way to achieving it. Breakthrough Listen is a SETI kind of project that listen for artificial signals from 1700 nearby stars up to 160 light years.

Some shots from Sofia. A very bright sky place. Zenith sky brightness info (2015): SQM 19.13 mag./arc sec2 Brightness 2.41 mcd/m2, Artif. bright. 2230 μcd/m2, Bortle class 6.

It is very important how you manage your data. So much shots, so much frames. They are full of hidden data that could be revealed later. The far we look the more we see. Each feint dot could be a galaxy far far way.

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