>Betelgeuse grand minimum is not that grand

  • Posted on: 24 January 2020
  • By: tihomiry

For a few months from now Betelgeuse (Alpha Orion) dim so much, that it looks as bright as the stars in the Orion belt. This is not so disturbing and does not mean that cataclysmic events are happening with it. This brightness lost is mostly in the visual spectrum. The star is still shining as the brightest one in the constellation, when looked into the inferred spectrum. Below is comparison of the Orion constellation seen in visible and inferred light. In visible Rigel (Beta Orion) seems to be the brightest star. However in Inferred, Betelgeuse outshines it quite a lot.
We all hope that this star will explode in near future, so we will have some nice target for shots and research. For our luck it is just far enough not to cause any troubles :)

Orion in Infrared:
Orion in infrared

Betelgeuse spectrum. White is infrared, Orange is Halpha.
Betelgeuse spectrum

Astrotracer is a great way to take advantage of the Pentax DSLR camera in-body shake reduction mechanism. It is available since Pentax k5 and track celestial bodies by moving the sensor. Here is what is it ablout:

Staying at my home inspires me to make some documentation of my experience. I got a dedicated drive for my astrophotos and start reorganize them by objects. Here is an article of the most recent process I use on my photos. Enjoy: )

For a few months from now Betelgeuse (Alpha Orion) dim so much, that it looks as bright as the stars in the Orion belt. This is not so disturbing and does not mean that cataclysmic events are happening with it.

For my last trip to the Rodopa mountain I decided to cross the limits and to target an object that is hard to believe that a non-professional equipment could catch.

While cleaning up my PC I found sequences of shots of Virgo galaxy cluster taken during springs of the last 2 years. Those were attempts to shot this object, but I was not satisfied with the result and left them.

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